combining images using clipping paths


















Note: In the full version of Photoshop, we can use layer masks to isolate a subject; In Photoshop Elements, there is no layer mask function for image layers, so we’ll be achieving the same effect using a Clipping Path.
  1. Choose two images and open both in Photoshop. One of these layers will be the background layer and the other will sit above. You may need to experiment to figure out which image works best as a background image.
    In our example, the skateboarder will be the background image. 
  2. Make your background (skateboarder) image the active image.
  3. Create a new blank layer by clicking Layer > New > Layer 
  4. Click Window > Swatches 
  5. Click on one of the vivid colors in the swatch panel (preferably one which is not in your image)
  6. Take your rectangular marquee tool and draw a rectangle around the part of the image you wish to keep.  
  7. Click Select > Inverse to outline everything except your rectangular area.  
  8. Click Edit > Fill; fill with your foreground color at 100%
    Your canvas should be filled with the vivid color you chose in step 5. 
  9. Click Select > Deselect to make your outline disappear.
  10. Use your polygon lasso, magnetic lasso, magic wand or quick select tool (newer versions of Photoshop & Elements) to begin outlining small portions around your subject.
  11. Click Edit > Fill; fill with your foreground color at 100%
  12. Repeat steps 10 and 11 until your subject is completely surrounded by your vivid color.
  13. If you make an error, use your eraser tool to remove excess color. Re-outline your subject and fill again.
  14. Save your work as a psd or tiff file – you will need your layers. 
  15. Make your other image the active image. In this example, it is the graffiti.
  16. Click Edit > Select All
  17. Click Edit > Copy
  18. Make your background image the active image with the vivid color layer as the active layer.
  19. Click Edit > Paste
    Your graffiti image should now cover the background image and vivid layer.
  20. Save your work. 
  21. Create a clipping mask
    1. In Photoshop CS2 or newer, Click Layer > Create Clipping Mask
    2. In older versions of Photoshop, Click Layer > Group with previous
    3. In Photoshop Elements 8, Click Layer > Create Clipping Mask
    4. In earlier versions of Elements, Click Layer > Group with Previous
  22. Save your work.
  23. (Optional) Use your move tool to move your topmost layer to a desirable position.
  24. (Optional) Crop your image
  25. Save your work.

Photo of the Week - November 25, 2010

Early Snow
Squirrel Footprints in our Backyard
November 25, 2010

Photoshop Exercise - Fixing Perspective















































  1. Open your photo in Photoshop
  2. Duplicate the Background layer by clicking Layer > Duplicate Layer
  3. Create a grid for aligning your image
    1. On the full version of Photoshop, click View > Show > Grid
    2. On Elements, Create a new layer (Layer > New Layer)
      Choose your Brush Tool
      Hold down the shift key and drag a horizontal line; release the mouse
      Click your mouse and then hold down the shift key and drag a horizontal line; repeat in horizontal and vertical stripes until you have enough of a grid to align your image.
  4. Make sure “Background Copy” is your active layer
  5. Begin Transforming:
    1. In the full version of Photoshop, Click Edit > Free Transform
    2. In Elements, Click Image > Transform > Free Transform
  6. Move your cursor off one of your corners and rotate the image until one edge is vertical (your image may work better if the straight edge is horizontal)
  7. In our example, the door has a perspective problem.
    Right Click (Ctrl Click in mac) and choose Perspective.
    Drag the upper right corner straight up so that the top edge of the door is parallel to one of your horizontal guides.
  8. In our example, this does not resolve all the perspective issues.
    Place your cursor in the middle of the right edge and drag down until you have an equal amount of perspective distortion at the top and bottom.
  9. Drag the upper right corner straight up so that the top edge of the door is parallel to one of your horizontal guides.
  10. Repeat steps 8 and 9 until the perspective tool has done all that it can
  11. Right Click (Ctrl Click in mac) and choose scale (or free transform)
    Drag the right edge out until the panel nearly fills the space.
  12. Right Click (Ctrl Click in mac) and choose distort
    Pull on the right hand corners until they are perfectly square.
  13. Hit the enter/return key to finish the transformation.
  14. Turn off your grid
    1. On the full version of Photoshop, click View > Show > Grid
    2. On Elements, make your grid layer your active layer and delete it.
  15. If you are finished with your image, flatten your image by clicking Layer > Flatten image.
  16. Save your work

Photo of the Week - November 18, 2010

Waiting for the stoplight to change
November 18, 2010
Bellevue, WA

Photo of the Week - November 17, 2010

Containers from the Port of Seattle
being loaded onto trains for
transport across the country
Dusk
Seattle, WA
November 17,2010
In April of 2008, Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF) began using four wide-span, electric, rail-mounted gantry cranes at its Seattle International Gateway (SIG) intermodal yard. BNSF is the first railroad in North America to install these cranes, which not only produce zero emissions on site, but allow more flexibility, increase capacity and reduce the need for diesel trucks to move containers within the facility. The new cranes increased BNSF’s capacity at the facility by about 30%. They span three tracks and are a green solution as they produce zero emissions, are quieter than the equipment they replaced and can regenerate power each time they lower a load.
To see the trains in action, head down to the SODO district of Seattle.



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Photo of the Week - November 12, 2010

Sunset
Barn Beach Reserve
Leavenworth, WA

Barn Beach Reserve is the home of a nature center, Icicle Arts, and the Upper Valley Museum at Leavenworth, on the east slope of the Cascade Mountains in Washington State. The Reserve and an adjacent city park combine to create a protected greenbelt of more than 50 acres of mature, streamside forest that includes Blackbird Island, a popular stop on Audubon's Great Washington Birding Trail.

Last weekend, Barn Beach hosted my talk "Migrations: the Transformative Power of Birds and Nature". It was a fun event, with a good turnout and an enthusiastic audience. In addition to hosting events like mine, Barn Beach also hosts Leavenworth's annual Bird Fest in the spring and offers environmental education to school and community groups.


If you wish to visit the beautful town of Leavenworth and Barn Beach Reserve, head out onto US Highway 2 from either Wenatchee or Stevens Pass and you are almost there.


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